Louise Jameson is one of those people who just radiates kindness and joy.  The first time we met was in Manchester at the very sadly now-defunct Lass O’Gowrie pub, ahead of a performance that evening at the Lowry theatre.  In hindsight, I can’t recall now whether or not I let her know that when I poked into the used bookstore later that afternoon, I found an impressive collection of Target novelisations, and all adventures featuring Leela, whom lovely Louise brought brilliantly to life opposite Tom Baker’s Doctor on television, and subsequently on audio with Big Finish, both as companion again to the Fourth Doctor, and in the series Gallifrey, which may well be my very favourite thing about the Doctor Who world.  She’s also a highly accomplished outside the realm of Who, with credits such as Tenko, Bergerac, and The Omega Factor under her belt, as well as a stint on Eastenders, and many appearances in the theatre.  Recently, she’s also lent her voice to the character of Jackie in the wonderful Big Finish adaptation of Survivors.
I first met Jameson just ahead of the release of what was to be the sixth and final series of Gallifrey.  Lamenting its end, I told her I would miss it when it was finished.  She suggested I write more.  Oh, how very tempting!
(And yes, Louise, Gary DID give me the biggest hug when I showed him that Leela-and-Narvin-are-the-best-friends-ever tshirt of mine.)

Louise Jameson is one of those people who just radiates kindness and joy.  The first time we met was in Manchester at the very sadly now-defunct Lass O’Gowrie pub, ahead of a performance that evening at the Lowry theatre.  In hindsight, I can’t recall now whether or not I let her know that when I poked into the used bookstore later that afternoon, I found an impressive collection of Target novelisations, and all adventures featuring Leela, whom lovely Louise brought brilliantly to life opposite Tom Baker’s Doctor on television, and subsequently on audio with Big Finish, both as companion again to the Fourth Doctor, and in the series Gallifrey, which may well be my very favourite thing about the Doctor Who world.  She’s also a highly accomplished outside the realm of Who, with credits such as Tenko, Bergerac, and The Omega Factor under her belt, as well as a stint on Eastenders, and many appearances in the theatre.  Recently, she’s also lent her voice to the character of Jackie in the wonderful Big Finish adaptation of Survivors.

I first met Jameson just ahead of the release of what was to be the sixth and final series of Gallifrey.  Lamenting its end, I told her I would miss it when it was finished.  She suggested I write more.  Oh, how very tempting!

(And yes, Louise, Gary DID give me the biggest hug when I showed him that Leela-and-Narvin-are-the-best-friends-ever tshirt of mine.)

It was a characteristically grey Lancashire morning when I met up with the lovely Stephen Gallagher, who was speaking that afternoon at the university in Preston.  After a nice wander around the campus shooting the breeze and taking getting photographical, we found ourselves in the audience of a talk about the science behind Doctor Who.  I’m fairly sure that the target demographic was considerably younger than Stephen and myself, mind, as the young chap of about 6 or so was excitedly whispering the names of all the monsters on the Doctor Who quiz sheet we had all been given.
(I swear we’d have aced the quiz too, even without the young gentleman inadvertently feeding us all the answers.)
I’m not normally one given to egregious displays of fangirl behaviour, but  I must admit that I was so pleased that this gentleman agreed to be a part of this project, as he wrote the fascinating, beautiful departure stories for two of my very favourite companions : Warrior’s Gate, which sees Romana’s farewell, with K-9 in tow, and Terminus, where Nyssa says goodbye to the TARDIS.  Both of these stories see our heroines departing in order to go on to bigger and better things, where they feel they will be able to affect significant positive change, to do something meaningful with their lives.  It’s always heartwarming to see companions get the farewell that they deserve, and these two serials served their departing companions admirably.  He’s been quite busy since as well, writing for a number of shows as well as novels (including the novelizations of his two Doctor Who stories, albeit under the pseudonym John Lydecker, for some reason) and two short story collections, as well as directing, creating and writing for The Eleventh Hour, both in its UK and US incarnations, and serving as co-executive producer on The Forgotten.  And he’s delightful company to boot.  You can keep up with his many adventures on his blog, and I highly encourage you do.  What a wonderful fellow!

It was a characteristically grey Lancashire morning when I met up with the lovely Stephen Gallagher, who was speaking that afternoon at the university in Preston.  After a nice wander around the campus shooting the breeze and taking getting photographical, we found ourselves in the audience of a talk about the science behind Doctor Who.  I’m fairly sure that the target demographic was considerably younger than Stephen and myself, mind, as the young chap of about 6 or so was excitedly whispering the names of all the monsters on the Doctor Who quiz sheet we had all been given.

(I swear we’d have aced the quiz too, even without the young gentleman inadvertently feeding us all the answers.)

I’m not normally one given to egregious displays of fangirl behaviour, but  I must admit that I was so pleased that this gentleman agreed to be a part of this project, as he wrote the fascinating, beautiful departure stories for two of my very favourite companions : Warrior’s Gate, which sees Romana’s farewell, with K-9 in tow, and Terminus, where Nyssa says goodbye to the TARDIS.  Both of these stories see our heroines departing in order to go on to bigger and better things, where they feel they will be able to affect significant positive change, to do something meaningful with their lives.  It’s always heartwarming to see companions get the farewell that they deserve, and these two serials served their departing companions admirably.  He’s been quite busy since as well, writing for a number of shows as well as novels (including the novelizations of his two Doctor Who stories, albeit under the pseudonym John Lydecker, for some reason) and two short story collections, as well as directing, creating and writing for The Eleventh Hour, both in its UK and US incarnations, and serving as co-executive producer on The Forgotten.  And he’s delightful company to boot.  You can keep up with his many adventures on his blog, and I highly encourage you do.  What a wonderful fellow!

On the brisk Friday I had planned to meet up with Jessica Martin, I was late.

Like, seriously late. I had made the rookie foreigner’s mistake of believing that there was any chance at all that the Mega Bus would arrive within a relatively decent window of its scheduled time of arrival. I was so very, very wrong.

But the lovely Ms. Martin was quite patiently awaiting me at a little patisserie in Soho when I finally managed to tumble thorough the door, offering endless out-of-breath apologies. I do normally pride myself on my punctuality, honest!

When I’d caught my breath, we finally got to talking about travelling and London and all things artistic, and what an engaging, creative woman she is. Whovians will remember her best as Mags, the seriously awesome werewolf who befriended The Doctor and Ace in The Greatest Show In The Galaxy. She’s since lent her talents to many projects, including a cameo appearance as the voice of Queen Elizabeth II in Voyage Of The Damned, and over this past holiday season, she appeared as the Fairy Godmother in a successful run of Cinderella in London - full circle, she says, having played Cinderella a few years earlier. She’s also turned her hand to a new medium of late: comics. With a charming vintage style and influenced by classic cinema, she has recently released It Girl, the story of silent film star Clara Bow, which has been receiving plenty of positive attention. She’s got a full-length graphic novel in the pipeline, and I know I’ll be watching her comics career continue to grow with great interest. Her blog, chronicling her life in comics, can be found here. Keep being fabulous, Jessica!

He’s been an invaluable presence on several series of Doctor Who, and he’s probably died nearly as many times as Rory Williams. His name is Matthew Jay, and he’s an extra.

It was by chance that I met Matthew one evening at a Doctor Who pub quiz in Cardiff. None of my usual teammates were in attendance that day, and I was invited to join a group of friendly regulars. I happened to mention People Of Who, and my quest to photograph the people who have been a part of making Doctor Who happen.

"Does that include extras?" he asks me. "Because I’ve been an extra on Doctor Who."

Wizard. I’m sure I was beaming with delight as Matthew and his friends told me of all the times he’d been killed on the show - by Daleks, Slitheen, the Master, and so on - and even once or twice when he’s managed to escape a day’s filming unscathed. He also gives tours of various Doctor Who filming locations in and around Cardiff, and Gosh knows there are a lot of them.

Extras really are the unsung heroes of the Doctor Who world. They unobtrusively populate the world around the story: without them, it would seem strangely quiet indeed.  And the frequency with which they bravely sacrifice their lives to many and various alien menaces is really something. It tells us those aliens are properly dangerous without having to introduce a new Doctor every week, and that’s important. So thank you for letting yourself get killed all those times, sir. You rock.

(Also, that night was the first and only time I’ve been on the winning team at a pub quiz.)

He’s been an invaluable presence on several series of Doctor Who, and he’s probably died nearly as many times as Rory Williams. His name is Matthew Jay, and he’s an extra.

It was by chance that I met Matthew one evening at a Doctor Who pub quiz in Cardiff. None of my usual teammates were in attendance that day, and I was invited to join a group of friendly regulars. I happened to mention People Of Who, and my quest to photograph the people who have been a part of making Doctor Who happen.

"Does that include extras?" he asks me. "Because I’ve been an extra on Doctor Who."

Wizard. I’m sure I was beaming with delight as Matthew and his friends told me of all the times he’d been killed on the show - by Daleks, Slitheen, the Master, and so on - and even once or twice when he’s managed to escape a day’s filming unscathed. He also gives tours of various Doctor Who filming locations in and around Cardiff, and Gosh knows there are a lot of them.

Extras really are the unsung heroes of the Doctor Who world. They unobtrusively populate the world around the story: without them, it would seem strangely quiet indeed. And the frequency with which they bravely sacrifice their lives to many and various alien menaces is really something. It tells us those aliens are properly dangerous without having to introduce a new Doctor every week, and that’s important. So thank you for letting yourself get killed all those times, sir. You rock.

(Also, that night was the first and only time I’ve been on the winning team at a pub quiz.)

I remember the first time I met Michael Jayston, we were chatting about this and that, and for some reason I mentioned that sometimes I fear having trouble being taken seriously as a professional, as I do tend to look a bit young for my age.
"Really?" he said. "Because you honestly don’t look a day over 64."
Oh Michael, you ol’ smoothie. I do enjoy a bit of ridiculous banter.
Who fans - and if you’re reading this, you probably are one - will remember Jayston’s understated, menacing performance as the Scrapyard Barnyard Junkyard Valeyard in the show’s Trial Of A Time Lord season, a role he has since reprises in the Big Finish audios He Jests At Scars and the recent Trial Of The Valeyard. He’s been in far too many other things to list them all; that said, I would be remiss if I failed to mention his performance opposite Alec Guinness in the fabulous BBC adaptation of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.
Then there was the time I mentioned being a lapsed academic, and he looked at me incredulously, and said “did you say you’re a lapdancer?” and I laughed so hard I could barely breathe. So thank you for that, sir.

I remember the first time I met Michael Jayston, we were chatting about this and that, and for some reason I mentioned that sometimes I fear having trouble being taken seriously as a professional, as I do tend to look a bit young for my age.

"Really?" he said. "Because you honestly don’t look a day over 64."

Oh Michael, you ol’ smoothie. I do enjoy a bit of ridiculous banter.

Who fans - and if you’re reading this, you probably are one - will remember Jayston’s understated, menacing performance as the Scrapyard Barnyard Junkyard Valeyard in the show’s Trial Of A Time Lord season, a role he has since reprises in the Big Finish audios He Jests At Scars and the recent Trial Of The Valeyard. He’s been in far too many other things to list them all; that said, I would be remiss if I failed to mention his performance opposite Alec Guinness in the fabulous BBC adaptation of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.

Then there was the time I mentioned being a lapsed academic, and he looked at me incredulously, and said “did you say you’re a lapdancer?” and I laughed so hard I could barely breathe. So thank you for that, sir.

Seán Carlsen is an absolute treasure, and someone I feel so blessed to know.
I still remember how he recognised me by my shirt the first day we met - granted, it was that shirt with his face on it. This is because the lovely Mr. Carlsen, familiar to the Doctor Who universe for some years now, is perhaps best known for voicing Coordinator Narvin in the brilliant, beautiful Big Finish audio series Gallifrey, and Narvin happens to be one of my favourite characters in the universe of Doctor Who, thanks in no small measure to his wonderful performance.
(I’m still sad that the series is over. I’d write series 7 myself if I thought I could bribe Big Finish into making it.)
I was chuffed to bits when he suggested we get a photograph with K-9, and even more so when K-9 agreed; after all, they were co-stars for six series.
You can find out all about what Seán’s up to on his website, and if you haven’t heard any of his audio adventures, go do it. Do it now. You won’t be disappointed.

Seán Carlsen is an absolute treasure, and someone I feel so blessed to know.

I still remember how he recognised me by my shirt the first day we met - granted, it was that shirt with his face on it. This is because the lovely Mr. Carlsen, familiar to the Doctor Who universe for some years now, is perhaps best known for voicing Coordinator Narvin in the brilliant, beautiful Big Finish audio series Gallifrey, and Narvin happens to be one of my favourite characters in the universe of Doctor Who, thanks in no small measure to his wonderful performance.

(I’m still sad that the series is over. I’d write series 7 myself if I thought I could bribe Big Finish into making it.)

I was chuffed to bits when he suggested we get a photograph with K-9, and even more so when K-9 agreed; after all, they were co-stars for six series.

You can find out all about what Seán’s up to on his website, and if you haven’t heard any of his audio adventures, go do it. Do it now. You won’t be disappointed.

It just so happened, the day I met David Warner, that I caught the beginning of a Miss Marple he just so happened to have been in on the television that morning.

"I won’t spoil the ending for you, then," he said dryly, "because I don’t remember."

Fair enough, sir. I wouldn’t reasonably expect someone with so extensive a CV to remember the minutiae of everything they’ve been in. (Plus, it turns out that the 80s music Professor Grisenko - his character in the Eleventh Doctor story Cold War - was so fond of, Warner himself was largely unfamiliar with. This is something I can just about forgive, given that he did give a masterful performance in one of the best Star Trek: The Next Generation episodes ever made. And Tron. I think we can cut him some slack about Ultravox.)

And what’s more, he starred as the Doctor opposite Nicholas Courtney in Big Finish’s Unbound stories Sympathy For The Devil and Masters Of War. That’s pretty awesome, as far as I’m concerned.

It just so happened, the day I met David Warner, that I caught the beginning of a Miss Marple he just so happened to have been in on the television that morning.

"I won’t spoil the ending for you, then," he said dryly, "because I don’t remember."

Fair enough, sir. I wouldn’t reasonably expect someone with so extensive a CV to remember the minutiae of everything they’ve been in. (Plus, it turns out that the 80s music Professor Grisenko - his character in the Eleventh Doctor story Cold War - was so fond of, Warner himself was largely unfamiliar with. This is something I can just about forgive, given that he did give a masterful performance in one of the best Star Trek: The Next Generation episodes ever made. And Tron. I think we can cut him some slack about Ultravox.)

And what’s more, he starred as the Doctor opposite Nicholas Courtney in Big Finish’s Unbound stories Sympathy For The Devil and Masters Of War. That’s pretty awesome, as far as I’m concerned.

"Can we take a photo of me with the Dalek?" Anneke Wills asks me, beaming with delight.

I agree wholeheartedly with the suggestion, and the Dalek is more than happy to pose alongside his former adversary.  It’s nice to see that they’ve since become firm friends, and indeed seemed quite happy to be reunited.  It was a genuinely touching scene to witness.

It’s been a few years since the lovely Anneke first crossed paths with the Daleks as the playful and confident companion Polly.  She was also part of the TARDIS team to witness the very first regeneration - from William Hartnell’s Doctor to Patrick Troughton - and she speaks of both actors with such great warmth and affection.  Indeed, she’s also reprised the role of Polly for Big Finish, as well as reading audiobooks of her adventures for AudioGO.  She’s also recently recorded the audio edition of Who’s There? - The Life And Career Of William Hartnell, a biography lovingly written by Hartnell’s granddaughter, Jessica Carney.  Anneke also makes an appearance in An Adventure In Space And Time, the recent (stunningly beautiful and moving) biopic chronicling the early years of Doctor Who.  You can learn more about all of the interesting thing she’s done and doing in greater detail at her website.  To say that these are exciting times for fans of 60s Who, and the people instrumental in helping to create it, would be an understatement.  I’m sure dear Anneke would agree.

(As would the Dalek.  Though don’t ask him the last time he saw Power Of The Daleks.  He’s still hoping it’ll turn up, but preferably with a nice alternate ending where the Daleks win and live happily ever after.)

"Can we take a photo of me with the Dalek?" Anneke Wills asks me, beaming with delight.

I agree wholeheartedly with the suggestion, and the Dalek is more than happy to pose alongside his former adversary. It’s nice to see that they’ve since become firm friends, and indeed seemed quite happy to be reunited. It was a genuinely touching scene to witness.

It’s been a few years since the lovely Anneke first crossed paths with the Daleks as the playful and confident companion Polly. She was also part of the TARDIS team to witness the very first regeneration - from William Hartnell’s Doctor to Patrick Troughton - and she speaks of both actors with such great warmth and affection. Indeed, she’s also reprised the role of Polly for Big Finish, as well as reading audiobooks of her adventures for AudioGO. She’s also recently recorded the audio edition of Who’s There? - The Life And Career Of William Hartnell, a biography lovingly written by Hartnell’s granddaughter, Jessica Carney. Anneke also makes an appearance in An Adventure In Space And Time, the recent (stunningly beautiful and moving) biopic chronicling the early years of Doctor Who. You can learn more about all of the interesting thing she’s done and doing in greater detail at her website. To say that these are exciting times for fans of 60s Who, and the people instrumental in helping to create it, would be an understatement. I’m sure dear Anneke would agree.

(As would the Dalek. Though don’t ask him the last time he saw Power Of The Daleks. He’s still hoping it’ll turn up, but preferably with a nice alternate ending where the Daleks win and live happily ever after.)

It’s the delightful gents from Doctor Who Magazine, Peter Ware and Tom Spilsbury!  Hello, gents!

It was overcast as heck in Swansea when this pair of illustrious journalistic luminaries and I found ourselves on a patio, talking Doctor Who, the missing episode wild mass speculation flying around at the time, photographing things, generally being awesome.

If you aren’t reading Doctor Who Magazine, you really ought to be.  It’s only the most important publication in the world, after all.  As of press time, the 50th anniversary edition has just been released, and it is such a treasure of imagery and history and stories and news and comics and all kinds of beautiful surprises.  Worth every penny, guys, as always.  And while you’re at it, go follow DWM and Tom and Peter on twitter, because they’re awesome.

It’s the delightful gents from Doctor Who Magazine, Peter Ware and Tom Spilsbury! Hello, gents!

It was overcast as heck in Swansea when this pair of illustrious journalistic luminaries and I found ourselves on a patio, talking Doctor Who, the missing episode wild mass speculation flying around at the time, photographing things, generally being awesome.

If you aren’t reading Doctor Who Magazine, you really ought to be. It’s only the most important publication in the world, after all. As of press time, the 50th anniversary edition has just been released, and it is such a treasure of imagery and history and stories and news and comics and all kinds of beautiful surprises. Worth every penny, guys, as always. And while you’re at it, go follow DWM and Tom and Peter on twitter, because they’re awesome.

Wendy Padbury tows a perfect line between effortless elegance and profound cuteness.  She’s about as tiny as I am, which is always a refreshing change to having to crane my neck at unhealthy angles to talk to people, but I digress.

Lovely Wendy is, of course, fondly remembered for her portrayal of spangly futuristic girl genius Zoe, playing opposite Patrick Troughton and Frazer Hines.  Much to the delight of this TARDIS Team Cute fangirl, it is a role she continues to reprise in the Big Finish audio range.  And what’s more, in her subsequent work as an agent, she represented a number of later Who actors, and went on to discover Matt Smith, so Eleventh Doctor enthusiasts owe her a big hug, wouldn’t you agree?

We meet on an overcast patio on a grey but comfortable autumn day, where she is enjoying the most elegant cigarette I think I’ve ever seen.  It surprises a fellow patiomate that someone who was on children’s television in the 60s occasionally uses grown-up language.  Of course she does, but with such affable, down-to-earth grace.  Keep being fabulous, Wendy.  We love you.

Wendy Padbury tows a perfect line between effortless elegance and profound cuteness. She’s about as tiny as I am, which is always a refreshing change to having to crane my neck at unhealthy angles to talk to people, but I digress.

Lovely Wendy is, of course, fondly remembered for her portrayal of spangly futuristic girl genius Zoe, playing opposite Patrick Troughton and Frazer Hines. Much to the delight of this TARDIS Team Cute fangirl, it is a role she continues to reprise in the Big Finish audio range. And what’s more, in her subsequent work as an agent, she represented a number of later Who actors, and went on to discover Matt Smith, so Eleventh Doctor enthusiasts owe her a big hug, wouldn’t you agree?

We meet on an overcast patio on a grey but comfortable autumn day, where she is enjoying the most elegant cigarette I think I’ve ever seen. It surprises a fellow patiomate that someone who was on children’s television in the 60s occasionally uses grown-up language. Of course she does, but with such affable, down-to-earth grace. Keep being fabulous, Wendy. We love you.